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Global Engagement & Empowerment Forum on Sustainable Development (GEEF) 2021

3Ps Beyond Security: Peace, Prosperity and Partnership

February 4 – 5, 2021
Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea

Program at a Glance

Thursday, February 4 Friday, February 5
1

FEATURED SESSION 1

TITLE: Artificial Intelligence for Better Engagement & Empowerment

HOST: Underwood International College in Yonsei University

1

OPENING CEREMONY

2

FEATURED SESSION 2

TITLE: Creative Solutions for a Sustainable Society

HOST: Institute for Global Engagement & Empowerment (IGEE) at Yonsei University

2

ROUND TABLE SESSION

TITLE: Global Partnership during and post COVID-19

HOST: Yonsei University

3

FEATURED SESSION 3

TITLE:Safe & Affordable Surgery

HOST: Yonsei Institute for Global Health, Yonsei University Health System

3

SPECIAL CONVERSATION WITH A HIGH PROFILE GUEST

TITLE: Leaving No One Behind in a Post-Pandemic World

HOST: Yonsei University

4

FEATURED SESSION 4

TITLE: Future of Higher Education, Higher Education of the Future

HOST: Institute for Global Engagement & Empowerment (IGEE) at Yonsei University

4

FEATURED SESSION

TITLE: Redesign Our Future: The UN SDGs, 5 Years and the Next 10 Years

HOST: Ban Ki-moon Foundation For a Better Future

5

VIRTUAL GALA CONCERT

- Jungran Lee, Cello
- Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra

5

PLENARY SESSION

TITLE: Towards Carbon Neutrality for Planetary Sustainability

HOST: Yonsei University, National Council on Climate and Air Quality(NCCA)

6

FEATURED SESSION 5

TITLE: Global Partnership & Higher Education
“Postgraduate Medical Education in Africa: the status quo and challenges”

HOST: Medical Mission Center, Yonsei Institute for Global Health, Yonsei University Health System

6

CLOSING CEREMONY

Program in Detail

  • Thursday, February 4, 2021
  • Friday, February 5, 2021

GEEF 2021 PROGRAM SCHEDULE DAY 1

Thursday, February 4

TIME SCHEDULE
09:00(KST)

REGISTRATION

ON-Line: www.geef-sd.org

09:15-10:45
(90’)

FEATURED SESSION 1

TITLE: Artificial Intelligence for Better Engagement & Empowerment

HOST: Underwood International College in Yonsei University

Moderator

  • Keeheon Lee, Professor of Underwood International College, Yonsei University

Panelists

  • David Rolnick, Assistant Professor of the School of Computer Science, McGill University
  • Priya L. Donti, Ph.D. Candidate in Computer Science and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Chaesub Lee, Director of ITU Telecommunication Standardization Bureau
  • Jung-Woo Ha, Head of Naver AI
10:45-11:00
(15’)

BREAK TIME

11:00-12:30
(90’)

FEATURED SESSION 2

TITLE: Creative Solutions for a Sustainable Society

HOST: Institute for Global Engagement & Empowerment (IGEE) at Yonsei University

Moderator

  • Thomas Hongtack Kim, Founder of 2kg, Visiting Professor of Yonsei University

Panelists

  • Kevin Swaenepoel, CEO of One Club
  • Saffaan Qadir, Creative Director of Paulus
  • Merlee Jayme, Global President of Dentsu Mcgarrybowen & Chairmom Dentsu Jayme Syfu Philippines
12:30 -13:00
(30’)

BREAK TIME

13:00-14:30
(90’)

FEATURED SESSION 3

TITLE:Safe & Affordable Surgery

HOST: Yonsei Institute for Global Health, Yonsei University Health System

Moderator

  • Shinki An, Professor and Director of Yonsei Institute for Global Health, Yonsei University Health System

Panelists

  • John Gerard Meara, Kletjian Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine in the field of Global Surgery, Professor of Surgery, Harvard University
  • Ifereimi Waqainabete, Minister of Health, Republic of Fiji
  • Hyunwon Kim, Director General of Climate Crisis & Pandemic Response Department, Korea International Cooperation Agency
  • Tae-Soo Kim, Executive Director of Export-Import Bank of Korea
14:30-16:00
(90’)

BREAK TIME

16:00-17:30
(90’)

FEATURED SESSION 4

TITLE: Future of Higher Education, Higher Education of the Future

HOST: Institute for Global Engagement & Empowerment (IGEE) at Yonsei University

Moderator

  • Hongwon Suh, Professor of English Literature, Yonsei University

Panelists

  • Joon Heo, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University
  • Min Song, Professor of Library and Information Science, Yonsei University
  • Travis Lovett, Assistant Dean for Civic Engagement, Harvard University
  • Jae Shin Park, Vice-President of Korea International Cooperation Agency
  • Joanne Pagèze, Vice-President for Internationalisation at the University of Bordeaux
17:30-18:00
(30’)

BREAK TIME

18:00-19:30
(90’)

VIRTUAL GALA CONCERT

1. Johann Sebastian Bach, Suite for Cello Solo No.6 in D Major BWV1012
    Jungran Lee, Cello

2. Jean Sibelius, Symphony No.3 in C Major, Op.52
3. Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony No.9 in D minor, Op.125, IV. Finale
    Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra

19:30-21:00
(90’)

BREAK TIME

21:00-22:30
(90’)

FEATURED SESSION 5

TITLE: Global Partnership & Higher Education
“Postgraduate Medical Education in Africa: the status quo and challenges”

HOST: Medical Mission Center, Yonsei Institute for Global Health, Yonsei University Health System

Moderators

  • Chin Pak, Professor and Director of Medical Mission Center, Yonsei Institute for Global Health in Yonsei University Health System
  • Paul Choi, Professor and Director of International Program of Medical Mission Center, Yonsei Institute for Global Health, Yonsei University Health System

Keynote Speech

  • Mike Chupp, CEO, CMDA ; former medical superintendent of Tenwek Hospital, Kenya; faculty for PAACS , General Surgeon

Panelists

  • Mark Oloo, General Surgeon of St. Luke Medical Centre, Kenya
  • Dong-Won Kang, Representative of Africa Future Foundation Zimbabwe; Volunteer Lecturer, Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Zimbabwe, College of Health Sciences
  • Jin-kyong Chun, Medical Director of Africa Future Foundation Zimbabwe; Volunteer Lecturer, Dept. of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Zimbabwe, College of Health Sciences
  • Dr. Abbo Betty Kasimo, Medical Officer Special Grade of Makerere University, Uganda

GEEF 2021 PROGRAM SCHEDULE DAY 2

Friday, February 5

TIME SCHEDULE
08:00(KST)

REGISTRATION

ON-Line: www.geef-sd.org

08:00-08:20
(20’)

OPENING CEREMONY

Welcome Remarks

  • Seoung Hwan Suh, President of Yonsei University
  • Heinz Fischer, the 11th President of Austria & Co-Chair of the Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens

Congratulatory Remarks

  • Kang, Kyung-wha, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Korea
08:20-09:00
(20’)

KEYNOTE SPEECHES

  • Jim Yong Kim, Vice-Chairman of Global Infrastructure Partners & the 12th President of the World Bank
  • Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations
  • Nursultan Nazarbayev, the 1st President, Republic of Kazakhstan
  • Iván Duque Márquez, the 60th President, Republic of Colombia
09:00-09:10
(10’)

BREAK TIME

09:10-10:40
(90’)

ROUND TABLE SESSION

TITLE: Global Partnership during and post COVID-19

HOST: Yonsei University

Moderator

  • Kim, Donghoon, Senior Vice President for Administration & Development at Yonsei University

Panelists

  • Margaret Chan, the 7th Director-General of the World Health Organization
  • Jeffrey David Sachs, University Professor of Columbia University
  • A. K. Abdul Momen, Foreign Minister of Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh
  • Maria CASTILLO-FERNANDEZ, EU Ambassador to Republic of Korea
10:40-11:10
(30’)

SPECIAL CONVERSATION WITH A HIGH PROFILE GUEST

TITLE: Leaving No One Behind in a Post-Pandemic World

HOST: Yonsei University

Panelists

  • Ban Ki-moon, the 8th United Nations Secretary-General & Honorary Chair of IGEE
  • Angelina Jolie, UNHCR Special Envoy
11:10-13:00
(110’)

LUNCH BREAK

13:00-14:30
(90’)

FEATURED SESSION

TITLE: Redesign Our Future: The UN SDGs, 5 Years and the Next 10 Years

HOST: Ban Ki-moon Foundation For a Better Future

Moderator

  • Rae Kwon Chung, Former Ambassador for Climate Change, Republic of Korea

Keynote Speech

  • Tae Yong Jung, Professor and Director, Center for Global Sustainability, Yonsei University

Panelists

  • Jooyoung Kwak, Professor of School of Business, Yonsei University
  • Tae In Park, Academic-Industrial Cooperation Professor of Seoul National University
  • Eunhae Jeong, Director of Green Transformation Policy, Ministry of Environment, Republic of Korea
  • Bernard Woods, Director of Strategy & Planning Department, Asian Development Bank
  • Junichi Fujino, Programme Director of Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Japan
14:30-15:00
(30’)

BREAK TIME

15:00-16:30
(90’)

PLENARY SESSION

TITLE: Towards Carbon Neutrality for Planetary Sustainability

HOST: Yonsei University, National Council on Climate and Air Quality (NCCA)

Moderator

  • Kim Sook, Chairman of the Strategic Planning and Coordination Committee, NCCA

Panelists

  • Patrick V. Verkooijen, CEO of Global Center on Adaptation
  • Soogil Young, Chairman of SDSN Korea
  • Bindu N. Lohani, Chairman of Board, Clean Air Asia, Philippines
  • Jean Asselborn, Minister of Foreign and European Affairs, Luxembourg
16:30-16:35
(5’)

CLOSING CEREMONY

Closing Remark

  • Ban Ki-moon, the 8th United Nations Secretary-General & Honorary Chair of IGEE


※ PLEASE NOTE

This program is subject to change without notice.

Lunch is not provided.

 

GEEF 2021 DAY1 FEATURED SESSION 1

Artificial Intelligence for Better Engagement & Empowerment

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4 at 09:15 – 10:45 KST

Background and Rationale

In recent years, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its subset applications such as machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL) have gained widespread attention, as well as some skepticism about its major promises in increasing productivity and efficacy in activities previously undertaken by humans. AI can be divided into two types: narrow and general. General AI describes a type of application that effectively replicates the processes of a human brain without any human intervention. This is the type of AI usually depicted in popular media, which has often led to suspicion by the general public. However, this type of AI is at present theoretical and there are no applications in use today. The type of AI that surrounds us is Narrow AI, which is trained to perform specific tasks under human supervision. Some AI capabilities include object recognition, decision making, problem solving, understanding language, learning from examples, and other combinations or variations of these.

For the purpose of sustainable development, AI can serve as a valuable tool to keep track of SDG achievement and help arrive at the best decisions that take into account multiple societal, environmental and economic considerations. Many movements have emerged from this opportunity, such as AI for social good and AI for sustainability, as well as more focused activities like machine learning applications for climate change.

Some misdirected applications of AI could result in higher income inequality, narrower work opportunities, and concerns for personal privacy. Yet, we must be reminded that technological advancement does not occur spontaneously but is steered by human intention and need. The international community has already established principles to direct AI solutions to ensure a better future for all. In 2018, the European Commission established the High-Level Expert Group on AI and published the Ethics Guidelines for Trustworthy AI. The following year, the OECD published the Recommendation of the Council on Artificial Intelligence agreed upon by all member countries and several partner countries.

Borrowing from the case of Korea, we can observe how different actorsgovernment, industry and academia are engaging in AI to serve society. In 2017, the Korean government established the Presidential Committee on the Fourth Industrial Revolution, with the mandate to suggest policies pertaining to AI and other data technology. A leading example of industry's work in AI is that of NAVER LABS, hich ecenl ceaed a 3D model of Seol and mapped all of its roads, enabling the development of safer and more efficient transportation services, and thus bringing positive benefits to the city's population. Yonsei University has also come into agreements with top technology companies such as NAVER and Kakao to implement educational services based on AI. The University has also gone beyond and integrated AI-based solutions to its very own Yongin Severance Hospital, part of the Yonsei University Health System.

The case of Korea portrays how multiple actors can engage and empower one another at the national level. On an international level, there are also many critical issues that call for the engagement and empowerment of different stakeholders in the AI and development spheres. A recent and vivid example is the COVID-19 pandemic and related issues, such as vaccine development and distribution. With global issues in mind, panelists are encouraged to discuss current and future approaches for international and interdisciplinary cooperation.

Intergovernmental organizations, governments, industry and academia are all engaging in different AI applications for sustainable development. However, we must avoid fragmented efforts and recognize the need to empower one another. The Featured Session will offer a platform to discuss current activities and possible directions for mutually empowering partnerships among different stakeholders to deploy AI solutions that can accelerate the achievement of the SDGs.

Session Objectives

  • Introduce current efforts by early career academics, intergovernmental organizations, government and industry partners who work on utilizing latest science, technology and innovation to achieve the SDGs
  • Share lessons learned from offering interdisciplinary research and education of SDGs at higher education institution
  • Examine actionable ways to overcome the short-term oriented trend in collaborations in AI for SD and move towards more sustained and deeper partnerships
  • Discuss the role of intergovernmental organizations in establishing global regulations on the use of AI and how to encourage policy co-creation with other stakeholders
  • Explore strategies to align private sector activities in AI with the achievement of the SDGs, balancing the creation of monetary revenue as well as positive returns to society and the environment
  • Present successful cases of AI applications to address global issues. For example, use of AI to help develop COVID-19 vaccines and determine distribution

Related SDGs

  • SDG 9 Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • SDG 17 Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development
    • Target 17.16 Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
Panelists

[Moderator]

  • Keeheon Lee, Professor of Underwood International College, Yonsei University

[Panelists]

  • David Rolnick, Assistant Professor at the School of Computer Science, McGill University
  • Priya L. Donti, Ph.D. Candidate in Computer Science and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Chaesub Lee, Director of ITU Telecommunication Standardization Bureau
  • Jung-Woo Ha, Head of Naver AI

References

European Commission.
(2018). High-Level Expert Group on Artificial Intelligence. Ethics guidelines for trustworthy AI. https://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/dae/document.cfm? doc_id=60419 (2019).

IBM (2020, June 3).
Artificial Intelligence (AI). https://www.ibm.com/cloud/learn/whatisartificial-intelligence

NAVER LABS.
(2020, August 6). Unveiling 2,092-km road layout, featuring Seoul's citywide road data. https://www.naverlabs.com/en/storyDetail/175

OECD. (2019).
Artificial Intelligence in Society. https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/scienceandtechnology/artificial-intelligence-in-society_eedfee77-en

Presidential Committee on the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
https://www.4th-ir.go.kr/home/Yonsei University. (2020, August 7). Yonsei Partners with Naver Business Platform to BuildVirtual Educational Platform "Y-EdNet". https://www.yonsei.ac.kr/en_sc/yonsei_news.jsp?mode=view&article_no=187909&b oard_wrapper=%2Fen_sc%2Fyonsei_news.jsp&pager.offset=0&board_no=585&title =yonsei-partners-with-naver-business-platform-to-build-virtual-educational-platform

Yonsei University. (2020, October 3). Yongin Severance Hospital receives Minister of Science & ICT Award at 20th Korea Digital Management Innovation Awards.
https://www.yonsei.ac.kr/en_sc/yonsei_news.jsp?mode=view&article_no=191071&b oard_wrapper=%2Fen_sc%2Fyonsei_news.jsp&pager.offset=0&board_no=585&title =yongin-severance-hospital-receives-minister-of-science-&-ict-award-at-20th-koreadigitalmanagement-innovation-awards

GEEF 2021 DAY1 FEATURED SESSION 2

Creative Solutions for a Sustainable Society

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4 at 11:00 – 12:30 KST

Background and Rationale

Throughout the history of international development cooperation, bilateral, multilateral, and international organizations centered around the Global North, were the major actors and donors. Despite their continued inputs, the development aid effectiveness has been controversial because sometimes, international aid exacerbated the crisis or made no change, perpetuated corruption, and was used as an exploitative tool by developed countries to gain leverage. The dire state of the African continent, especially Sub-Saharan African countries and a few Southeast Asian countries are unfortunate examples of such failed international development aid. With such a critique in mind, the need to improve international development by addressing the shortcomings and promoting the strengths has become indispensable.

In contemporary discussions on how to improve development cooperation, the role of newly emerging actors such as Global South countries, civil society, and the private sector has become more integral than ever before in achieving sustainable development.

Advertisement industry, particularly film making and digital platforms, has been contriving and spreading interdisciplinary ideas to alleviate poverty and gender, education, and economic inequality, promote good health and well-being, and engage in environmental issues. Advertisements and digital contents are no longer simply a sales promotion tool for enterprises but have evolved and must evolve to establish creative ideas with positive social impact and raise awareness of noteworthy ideas, products, and issues. A quote from Bill Gates Foundation’s Museum, “Use your creativity to help”, highlights the potential of human creativity in development cooperation field.

The private sector alone has manifold parties. The partnership within the private sector and with other actors is a critical part of enhancing development cooperation. The GEEF 2021 will provide a suitable platform for experts in the advertisement industry around the globe to come together and discuss their creative solutions, ideas, opportunities, and challenges. During the session, the speakers will introduce examples of creative ideas that devise positive impact and their roles in development cooperation, while addressing current challenges and changes. Especially because of Covid-19, 2021 needs specific and concrete advice and goals to fulfill by this year. Beyond abstract discussions about post Covid-19 and private sector, the session aims to provide ideas and raise critical questions about what we should be doing in the advertisement industry for sustainable development. Ultimately, the GEEF 2021 will promote collective intelligence and partnership for augmenting the work of the private sector and conclusively, international development cooperation, particularly in the areas of SDGs 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 14, 15, and 17.

Session Objectives

  • To share prominent creative ideas in the advertisement industry and their results.
  • To discuss current opportunities and challenges in different phases, such as development, implementation, and monitoring of the ideas.
  • To promote partnership in advertisement industry and private sector in sustainable development.
  • To propose ideas for detailed action plans and solutions for year 2021.
Panelists

[Moderator]

  • Thomas Hongtack Kim, Founder of 2kg, Visiting Professor of Yonsei University

[Panelists]

  • Kevin Swaenepoel, CEO of One Club
  • Saffaan Qadir, Creative Director of Paulus
  • Merlee Jayme, Global President of Dentsu Mcgarrybowen & Chairmom Dentsu Jayme
                              Syfu Philippines

Session Objectives

  • SDG 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.
  • SDG 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
  • SDG 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • SDG 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
  • SDG 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
    • Target 9.5 Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending.
    • Target 9.b Support domestic technology development research and innovation in developing countries, including by ensuring a conducive policy environment for, inter alia, industrial diversification and value addition to commodities. (9.b.1 Proportion of medium and high-tech industry value added in total value added)
  • SDG 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas, and marine resources for sustainable development
  • SDG 15. Protect, restore, and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.
  • SDG 17. Partnerships for the Goals “Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development”
    • Target 17.6: Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge-sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism (17.6.1 Number of science and/or technology cooperation agreements and programmes between countries, by type of cooperation)
    • Target 17.8: Fully operationalize the technology bank and science, technology and innovation capacity-building mechanism for least developed countries by 2017 and enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology

GEEF 2021 DAY1 FEATURED SESSION 3

Safe & Affordable Surgery

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4 at 13:00 – 14:30 KST

Background and Rationale

In 2020, COVID-19 pandemic changed many parts of the society. In order to prevent the spread of COVID-19, we have taken a global response to pandemic, prioritizing preventive measures such as social distancing, tracking down the contacts and isolating the confirmed patients. However, although these restrictions are necessary, they have also caused many social obstacles, including economic burden, limited opportunities for education, and so on.

Health care sector is also experiencing various obstacles. Concerns on direct infection of COVID-19 have resulted in delays in essential medical services, and the burden of disease of primary healthcare and chronic diseases has increased dramatically. Even for developed countries with well-established health systems, these issues are burdensome, and for developing countries, the issue is worse.

A strong and resilient health system is essential to maintaining the health and sustainability of the members in this period of uncertainty. Rapid and accurate testing requires skilled personnel and sufficient supply of testing equipment. From simple treatment and medication to respirators, critical care, operating room and rehabilitation, medical care must be delivered within a single organic system. We experience that the strong and sound health care ecosystem that developed countries enjoy is thought of as simple relief or ideal state in many countries. The discomfort from this experience makes us feel a lack of universal health coverage (UHC) that we ultimately intend to achieve, and the COVID-19 pandemic starkly illustrates this issue.

We know what the last mile to achieve the UHC is. It is safe and affordable surgery. This is not just a story about surgical procedures. This is about the change and development of the health system. Through MDGs to SDGs, maternal mortality has reduced, and the number of healthy children increased, but this is not enough for the SDGs to be achieved by 2030. In order to overcome the last hurdle, it is essential to introduce safe and affordable surgery. Surgery saves the lives of millions of people every year and improves their quality of life. The economic benefit of surgery is very high compared to the ‘Cost of Doing Nothing’ we must bear when we don't conduct surgeries. Medical personnel trained for surgical procedures improve the quality of medical care, and logistics systems designed to maintain surgeries enable a stable supply of medicines. Therefore, surgery, referred to as the last stepchild of international health care, is an important component of a strong, resilient health system that will increase responsiveness to infectious and chronic diseases.

Yet 5 billion people do not have access to safe and affordable surgical care. This issue is most prominent in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs) where 9 out of 10 people are unable to access true surgical care, resulting in surgery avertible deaths and disabilities. In the Western Pacific Region, access to safe and affordable surgery remains limited.

In October 2020, the World Health Organization Regional Committee Meeting for Western Pacific received the approval of the Action Framework for Safe and Affordable Surgery from all member states. The agreement on surgical treatment in the Western Pacific will be an important cornerstone of health care development and the resulting economic prosperity in the region. In GEEF 2021, we would like to discuss safe and affordable surgery in the Asia Pacific region and discuss future partnerships. We hope this will serve as a new chapter in cooperation with Asia Pacific region, which are facing a new challenge of improving health care quality and responding to the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Session Objectives

  • Introduce the role of universal access to surgical, obstetric, anesthesia, and trauma care in achieving the SDGs.
  • Discuss opportunities and challenges in providing access to safe and affordable surgical care in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Suggest action plans to support the financing of access to surgical care in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Propose international and regional partnerships to facilitate the strengthening of surgical systems.
Panelists

[Moderator]

  • Shinki An, Professor and Director of Yonsei Institute for Global Health,
                       Yonsei University Health System

[Panelists]

  • John Gerard Meara, Kletjian Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine in the
                                       field of Global Surgery, Professor of Surgery, Harvard University
  • Ifereimi Waqainabete, Minister of Health, Republic of Fiji
  • Hyunwon Kim, Director General of Climate Crisis & Pandemic Response Department,
                              Korea International Cooperation Agency
  • Tae-Soo Kim, Executive Director of Export-Import Bank of Korea

GEEF 2021 DAY1 FEATURED SESSION 4

Future of Higher Education, Higher Education of the Future

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4 at 16:00 – 17:30 KST

Background and Rationale

Higher education needs to change in line with the Fourth Industrial Revolution which requires talents associated with diversity, connectivity and resilience. Higher education already has faced several phases of change, including the transfer to online from offline classrooms due to COVID-19. Online classes further emphasize the importance of communication and the need for changes in teaching style and its contents. Therefore, Yonsei University has been building an online class platform, Y-EdNet, by forming partnerships with several other schools. The platform would be open to not only Yonsei students but also to many others from domestic and foreign universities so that a wider audience becomes eligible to high quality lectures. In this challenging era, the role of universities is becoming essential as they need to foster more active communications among students and support them to learn more effectively even in non-face-to-face situations. Furthermore, it would be crucial to prepare classes related to human rights sensitivity and respect for diversity to promote a healthy communication environment.

Session Objectives

  • Discuss the necessity of innovation in higher education based on SDGs 4: Quality Education
  • Introduce Y-EdNet being built by Yonsei University in line with the shift in the educational paradigm that values digital lectures
  • Share each university’s plans for innovative higher education
  • Propose international and regional partnerships to facilitate the innovative change in higher education

Related SDGs

  • SDG 4. Quality Education
    • Target 4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development
Panelists

[Moderator]

  • Hongwon Suh, Professor of English Literature, Yonsei University

[Panelists]

  • Joon Heo, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University
  • Min Song, Professor of Library and Information Science, Yonsei University
  • Travis Lovett, Assistant Dean for Civic Engagement, Harvard University
  • Jae Shin Park, Vice-President of Korea International Cooperation Agency
  • Joanne Pagèze, Vice-President for Internationalisation at the University of Bordeaux

GEEF 2021 DAY1 FEATURED SESSION 5

Global Partnership & Higher Education

“Postgraduate Medical Education in Africa: the status quo and challenges”

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4 at 21:00 – 22:30 KST

Key Concepts

  • Medical education consists of undergraduate and postgraduate training. Postgraduate training includes participating in residency training and continuing education programs. Postgraduate training is important for medical school graduates to develop their specialties. However, postgraduate training in Africa is not standardized in each country.
  • Recently many domestic and international institutions started working together to improve postgraduate training in Africa.
  • This session will introduce and discuss the status quo and challenges of postgraduate training from the perspectives of local professors, students, and international health workers.
  • During the session, the speakers will discuss the impact of postgraduate training on the Christian medical mission.
  • The session will also cover how the COVID-19 pandemic affected postgraduate training.

Session Objectives

  • To share information
  • To discuss what should be done to improve the postgraduate training in Africa
  • To facilitate networking
Panelists

[Moderators]

  • Chin Pak, Professor and Director of Medical Mission Center, Yonsei Institute for
                     Global Health in Yonsei University Health System
  • Paul Choi, Professor and Director of International Program of Medical Mission Center,
                       Yonsei Institute for Global Health, Yonsei University Health System

[Keynote Speech]

  • Mike Chupp, CEO, CMDA ; former medical superintendent of Tenwek Hospital, Kenya;
                          faculty for PAACS, General Surgeon

[Panelists]

  • Mark Oloo, General Surgeon of, St. Luke Medical Centre, Kenya
  • Dong-Won Kang, Representative of Africa Future Foundation Zimbabwe; Volunteer Lecturer,
                                  Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Zimbabwe, College of Health
                                  Sciences
  • Jin-kyong Chun, Medical Director of Africa Future Foundation Zimbabwe; Volunteer Lecturer,
                                 Dept. of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Zimbabwe, College of Health
                                 Sciences
  • Abbo Kasimo Betty, Medical Officer Special Grade of Makerere University, Uganda

GEEF 2021 DAY2 KEYNOTE SPEECHES

3Ps(Peace, Prosperity and Partnership) Beyond Security

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5 at 08:20 – 09:00 KST

Background and Rationale

Global Engagement & Empowerment Forum (GEEF) will be held from February 4th to 5th of 2021 under the theme “3Ps(Peace, Prosperity, and Partnership) Beyond Security.” These three key concepts have been chosen since they address the most urgent issues our world faces today.

In March of 2020, UN Secretary-General António Guterres called for a global ceasefire “to put armed conflict on lockdown and focus together on the true fight of our lives,” the coronavirus pandemic. The disease threatens our peace as it exacerbates drivers of conflict and insecurity, such as cross-border tensions, climate emergencies, social unrest, and eroding trust in institutions. Moreover, it has also reversed years of effort devoted to promote shared prosperity, especially among the bottom 40% of the population. According to the latest Sustainable Development Goals Report 2020, it is estimated that the pandemic will push 71 million people back into extreme poverty. Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic has presented major challenges to both the public and private sector, as the global society witnessed further fragmentation of the social fabric at local, national and regional scales. Some countries have had difficulties in promoting voluntary quarantine measures and medical treatment of COVID-19.

Under these circumstances, this Forum plans to shed light on the importance and necessity of the multilateral partnership and multisectoral responses to COVID-19. As the international community coordinated responses to COVID-19, we have at first hand realized the vulnerabilities of existing partnerships centered on a few developed countries. Consequently, the need for global solidarity and support among governments, businesses, and civil society organizations has become more important than ever.

Therefore, GEEF 2021 will discuss and explore ways of effective partnerships that go beyond the existing limitations. In particular, the round table session will be held to explore global partnership through multilateral cooperation and multisectoral partnerships to combat COVID-19. The Programme for GEEF 2021 will prioritize four key areas in six featured sessions:

  • Monitoring and Evaluation of UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as the blueprint for Sustainable Development through 1) Redesign Our Future: The UN SDGs, 5 Years and the Next 10 Years
  • Science, Technology and Innovation for SDGs through 2) A.I. for better Engagement & Empowerment
  • Society for SDGs on through 3) Creative Solutions for a Sustainable Society and 4) Health
  • Partnerships for Healthy Lives and Well-being through 5) Global Partnership and Higher Education and 6) Future of Higher Education, Higher Education of the Future

Previously, GEEF has invited global leaders and experts from various fields as speakers to discuss the direction we should take to achieve the SDGs. Held in 2018, the inaugural GEEF invited 65 speakers under the theme "Putting People and Planet at the Center." These in-depth dialogues focused on partnerships, climate change and health for common prosperity, and other topics, such as water, education, sustainable production and consumption, were also addressed in parallel sessions. Following the successful hosting of the first GEEF, the 2019 session invited 106 speakers and Panelists from 27 countries and main sessions on SDGs 3, 5 and 11 were offered. More than 2,000 participants from over 80 countries attended the second iteration of the Forum. GEEF has served as a platform to foster free flow of ideas among stakeholders on the SDGs to make a better world and lay the groundwork for a global cooperative society.

It is our hope that discussions offered through parallel sessions at GEEF 2021 on how to improve partnerships would lead to shared prosperity and promote peaceful societies. The concept of ‘Security’ can be extended to cover not only diplomacy and national defense, but also various dimensions that can lead to transnational insecurity, e.g., climate change, mass migration, widening inequalities, water scarcity, biodiversity loss, and deforestation. GEEF 2021 hopes that this year’s forum will serve as a venue for the global community to discuss how to build 3Ps beyond security to rebuild our society’s resilience for the post-COVID 19 era.

Session Objectives

  • Share emerging issues and pressing challenges to tackle as a global community
  • Discuss future directions and actions speakers will take in 2021
  • Offer suggestions on what the audience should think and act upon in 2021
Panelists

[Speakers]

  • Jim Yong Kim, Vice-Chairman of Global Infrastructure Partners & the 12th President of the
                              World Bank
  • Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations
  • Nursultan Abishevich Nazarbayev, the 1st President, Republic of Kazakhstan
  • Iván Duque Márquez, the 60th President, Republic of Colombia

GEEF 2021 DAY2 ROUND TABLE

Global Partnership during and post COVID-19

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5 at 09:10-10:40 KST

Background and Rationale

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated once again that multilateral cooperation, multisectoral partnerships, and global solidarity will be essential to guarantee resilience for the global community. The range of activities that require coordination to combat COVID-19 pandemic is wide; cooperation is needed not just for the development of vaccines but also for sharing lessons learned from systematic programs for short-run relief programs and medium-run post-COVID19 recovery plans. Moreover, the social and economic shock brought upon by COVID-19 has put the entire world a step backward on its endeavor to pursue the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Consequently, there is an urgent need for discussion on how to move forward despite what we experienced in year 2020.

The importance of multisectoral partnerships and collaboration is highlighted by the impact of COVID-19 on sectors beyond health. According to the World Bank, economic growth has slowed down globally as various economic activities were suspended due to physical barriers caused by COVID-19. Under-employment and unemployment issues are exacerbated, putting a halt on efforts for poverty reduction. The FAO showed concerns and started initiatives on the agricultural sector as it is also hit by the economic crisis, threatening global food security. As the United Nations reports, developing countries without adequate IT infrastructure are failing to provide suitable online education. Schools in underdeveloped regions were not just places for education, but often acted as the bridge to gender equality and healthy life. With the closure of schools around the world, children of the most vulnerable countries are in danger of being neglected. International organizations such as UNICEF, WHO, and the World Bank are already forming multisectoral programs to address these issues. In order to mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 in various areas including public health, forming a rigid system of response to global challenges through multisectoral partnerships is needed.

Multisectoral partnerships, however, must be accompanied by multilateral cooperation as actors on various levels need to be engaged to create a collective impact. World leaders at the 75th UN General Assembly showed strong support for multilateralism, recognizing the role of multilateral cooperation in addressing global threats. COVID-19 is neither the first nor the only challenge that global society faces together. Preexisting issues such as climate change and various inequalities require coordinated responses. COVID-19 is a reminder to the global society that multilateral and multisectoral cooperation is the most effective system to tackle global threats. As numerous scholars anticipate, post-COVID-19 era will be vastly different and require a change in the paradigm of global partnerships. Reforming the multilateral and multisectoral cooperation system will be essential to build a resilient society

Session Objectives

  • Discuss key barriers that have prevented constructive multilateral cooperation and multisectoral partnerships.
  • Allow speakers to communicate examples of innovation they have attempted to facilitate partnerships by engaging stakeholders.
  • Suggest how multilateral cooperation could alleviate the increasing conflicts and polarization among countries due to secure enough COVID-19 vaccines for their citizens.
  • Highlight which SDGs may need to be prioritized to build resilience in the post COVID-19 era.
  • Provide specific guidelines on how to lead a healthy life in 2021 during and after COVID-19.
Panelists

[Moderator]

  • Kim, Donghoon, Senior Vice President for Administration & Development at Yonsei University

[Panelists]

  • Margaret Chan, the 7th Director-General of the World Health Organization
  • Jeffrey David Sachs, University Professor of Columbia University
  • A. K. Abdul Momen, Foreign Minister of Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh
  • Maria CASTILLO-FERNANDEZ, EU Ambassador to Republic of Korea

GEEF 2021 DAY2 SPECIAL CONVERSATION WITH A HIGH PROFILE GUEST

Leaving No One Behind in a Post-Pandemic World

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5 at 10:40 – 11:10 KST

Background and Rationale

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated once again that multilateral cooperation and global solidarity will be essential to guarantee youth empowerment. As the Special Envoy Angelina Jolie noted, the pandemic has exacerbated various dimensions of inequities in our global society and the resulting setback is as much a threat to our interests as it is an affront to our values. The social and economic shock brought upon by COVID-19 has put the entire world a step backward on its endeavor to pursue the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In the face of these challenges, cooperation is needed not just for the development of vaccines but also for sharing lessons on how to ensure youth are not left behind to reach their full potential. Consequently, there is an urgent need for discussions on how to move forward and recover despite what we experienced in the year 2020.

Session Objectives

  • How can we inspire the younger generation to confront and address these global challenges?
  • How can we recover youth and education programs in the post-COVID-19 era?
  • What are some critical areas to focus on?
  • Who are the most vulnerable among youth?
  • How has COVID-19 attributed to worsen their conditions?
  • How can they be supported effectively?
Panelists
  • Ban Ki-moon, the 8th United Nations Secretary-General & Honorary Chair of IGEE
  • Angelina Joli, UNHCR Special Envoy

Related Data (Covid-19 and the vulnerable)

Youth
Economic hardship
In developing countries, the number of children living in monetarypoor households could increase by 142 million by 2021. This is adding onto already increased 150 million children without access to education, health care, housing, nutrition, sanitation or water due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The percentage of children without access to education and health services globally will increase from 46 percent to 56 percent in the post-COVID world (UNICEF, HYPERLINK "https://data.unicef.org/covid19-and-children/" link).

Digital Education
At least 463 million (31 percent) of schoolchildren worldwide cannot be reached by digital and broadcast remote learning programs. In Eastern and Southern Africa, 50.3 percent of children cannot be reached digitally (UNICEF, ibid).

Children health
370 million children may miss school meals. Disruptions to health services may result in 160 million children under 5 missing a crucial dose of Vitamin A (UNICEF, ibid). 80 million children under the age of 1 in at least 68 countries may miss out on receiving life-saving vaccines (UNICEF, HYPERLINK "https://data.unicef.org/ resources/immunization-coverage-are-we-losing-ground/" link).

Increased mortality
Over 2 million additional children under-five could die during the next 12 months due to COVID-19 (UNICEF, HYPERLINK "https://data.unicef.org/covid19-and-children/" link). Over 6 months, 253,500 ~ 1,157,000 additional child deaths and 12,200 ~ 56,700 additional maternal deaths would occur. The reduce overage of maternal health would account for 60 percent of additional maternal deaths (Johns Hopkins University, HYPERLINK "https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/ PIIS2214-109X(20)30229-1/fulltext" link)

Maternal care
Adolescent girls are particularly vulnerable to health service closures due to early pregnancy. In 2016, 7.4 million girls died during pregnancy and/or in labor (WHO, HYPERLINK "https://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/estimates/ en/" link). Essential maternal health care and family planning is likely to be neglected, increasing unintended pregnancies and morbidity and mortality.

HIV
Adolescent girls bear the brunt of the HIV epidemic. In sub-Saharan Africa, girls are four times likely to be newly infected with HIV than adolescent boys. Due to lost household income and schools shutting down, girls may also engage in transactional sex as a survival mechanism, further increasing their risks of HIV, STD, and unwanted pregnancies (WHO, HYPERLINK "https://data.unicef.org/topic/gender/covid-19/#_ ftn1"link).

Women
Domestic violence
Emergency calls for domestic violence cases increase in many countries including Argentina, Singapore, Cyprus, and USA by at least 20 percent (UN Women, HYPERLINK "https://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2020/5/press-releasethe-shadow-pandemic-of-violence-against-women-during-covid-19" link). In Vancouver, reports of domestic violence helpline increased by 300 percent (UN Women, HYPERLINK "https:// www.unwomen.org/-/media/headquarters/attachments/sections/library/publications/2020/ brief-covid-19-and-ensuring-safe-cities-and-safe-public-spaces-for-women-and-girlsinfographic-en.pdf?la=en&vs=5337" link). More than 37 percent of women in South Asia, 40 percent of women in South-East Asia, and up to 68 percent of women in the Pacific have experienced violence at the hands of their intimate partners (UN Women, HYPERLINK "https:// asiapacific.unwomen.org/-/media/field%20office%20eseasia/docs/publications/2020/04/ ap_first_100%20days_covid-19-executive-summary.pdf?la=en&vs=5024" link).

Shadow Pandemic is a public awareness campaign to highlight domestic violence in the pandemic crisis. “Domestic violence has multiplied, spreading across the world in a shadow pandemic” (Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women, (HYPERLINK "https://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2020/5/press-release-theshadow-pandemic-of-violence-against-women-during-covid-19" link).

Gendered childcare responsibility
In more than five of six countries with available data, girls aged 10–14 years are more likely than boys of the same age to spend 21 or more hours on household chores per week, an amount potentially harmful to children’s physical, social, psychological or educational development. As the amount of unpaid work increases during the pandemic, gender imbalance deepens (WHO, HYPERLINK "https://data.unicef.org/topic/gender/covid-19/#_ftn1"link).

Refugees
Of the 71 million people forcibly displaced around the world, over 80 per cent of refugees and nearly all internally displaced people are hosted in low- and middleincome countries. With severe burden of Covid-19, refugees are like to be neglected (HYPERLINK "https://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2020/6/compilation-womenrefugees-and-covid-19" link).

Sanitation and health
When basic sanitation is lacking, proper hygiene

GEEF 2021 DAY2 FEATURED SESSION

Redesign Our Future: The UN SDGs, 5 Years and the Next 10 Years

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5 at 13:00 – 14:30 KST

Background and Rationale

Many countries in the world have faced challenges in implementing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) since their establishment in 2015. The purpose of this session is to disseminate the recently released Ban Ki-moon Foundation Report Redesign Our Future: The UN SDGs, 5 Years and the Next 10 Years. This report includes five key messages (realigning interactions among the SDGs; rebalancing among SDG stakeholders; empowering and engaging stakeholders; monitoring and reviewing SDG implementation; and sharing experiences) from the 8th UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to take stock of the achievements of the SDGs during the past five years based on objective measurements and a concrete implementation plan for the next ten years. This report covers engagement with multiple stakeholders, including government, the private sector, NGOs, civil society, and international organizations. Furthermore, cooperation with relevant institutions and associations is analyzed. This report also reviews the current progress of achieving the SDGs in both quantitative and qualitative dimensions. By applying quantitative methods in selected countries, this paper draws meaningful implications to support the five key messages to the world.

Session Objectives

1)Problem identification: Sizing up the Challenge

2) Solution finding:

  • Re-aligning interactions among the SDGs
  • Assessing COVID-19 and the implications on the SDGs
  • Rebalancing among SDGs stakeholders
  • Empowering and engaging stakeholders
  • Monitoring and evaluating SDGs implementation
  • Sharing experience

3) Prospect: The way forward

Panelists

[Moderator]

  • Rae Kwon Chung, Former Ambassador For Climate Change, Republic of Korea

[Keynote Speech]

  • Tae Yong Jung, Professor and Director, Center for Global Sustainability, Yonsei University

[Panelists]

  • Jooyoung Kwak, Professor of School of Business, Yonsei University
  • Tae In Park, Academic-Industrial Cooperation Professor of Seoul National University
  • Eunhae Jeong, Director of Green Transformation Policy, Ministry of Environment, Republic of Korea
  • Bernard Woods, Director of Strategy & Planning Department, Asian Development BankUniversity
  • Junichi Fujino, Programme Director of Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Japan

GEEF 2021 DAY2 PLENARY SESSION

Towards Carbon Neutrality for Planetary Sustainability

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5 at 15:00 – 16:30 KST

Background and Rationale

As the global society changed its consumption, production, travel, and transport patterns during the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020, we have observed noticeable decreases in greenhouse gas emissions. However, these reductions would be temporary if we were to go back to business-as-usual practices. If countries allow COVID-19 to steer their attention and endeavors away from carbon-neutral initiatives, the world will soon face another threat from severe environmental degradation on every aspect of human life in terms of individual health, society, and the economy. Therefore, it would be essential to integrate carbon-reduction objectives along with other economic and social initiatives within the COVID-19 recovery plans.

Amid the pandemic, some countries have acknowledged this unmet need and pledged to become carbon neutral. Early last March, the European Commission presented a legally binding commitment to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 under the Climate Law. Moreover, China, the world’s largest emitter-accountable for approximately 28 percent of global emissions -, has announced to become carbon neutral by 2060 at the 75th session of the UN General Assembly last year. In accordance, a month later both South Korea and Japan declared national carbon neutrality projects by 2050. It is anticipated that the US will also take part in carbon-free production via the Biden Administration’s climate plan and return to the Paris Agreement once Joe Biden is sworn into office.

However, despite all the dedications, further discussion is needed as many countries lack the specifics on how they would achieve the objectives and it will be inevitable that challenges would arise during the process. For instance, governments face dilemma over a suite of policy options to choose from, e.g. carbon tax schemes and permit systems. As a result, mistargeting could lead to negative market distortions resulting in either overpricing or inflation of carbon allowances targeted to power industries. In addition, inconsistent trade and investment policies against carbon-neutral goals may confuse stakeholders in the private sector, creating obstacles for renewable energy development. Another drawback arises from potentially conflicting interests of the social sector concerning land use and job losses in the fossil fuel industries. Therefore, countries should share their experiences and future schemes on binding strong partnerships among the public, private, and social sectors to peacefully reach carbon neutrality.

Furthermore, roles of developing countries would be as critical as that of the developed countries as greenhouse gas emissions is a transboundary problem requiring dedication from all countries. However, the physical distancing and economic uncertainty resulting from COVID-19 are hindering progressive investments and green energy projects all around the world. On top of that, developing countries may find participating in the caron neutral agenda overwhelming due to the enormous challenges of controlling the infectious disease and securing sufficient medical care, along with measurements for economic recovery. Therefore, it would be essential to discuss means of empowering developing countries so that they can also actively engage in net-zero carbon emissions. Consequently, the call and need for multilateralism to act upon environmental stewardship to achieve carbon neutrality will be even more pertinent and urgent as we enter the third decade of the 21st century.

Session Objectives

  • How can we achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 or 2060?
  • Discuss policy challenges and lessons of COVID-19 that can be applied for carbon neutrality.
  • Suggest action points for one or more stakeholders to act upon in 2021 to achieve carbon neutrality.
  • Share ideas on how multilateral partnerships can overcome short-term oriented nature of domestic policymaking and policy procrastination.
  • Provide opinions on innovative solutions that can accelerate carbon-neutrality in the post-COVID-19 era taking into account the burdens countries may face due to health and economic difficulties as an aftermath of COVID-19.
  • Explore means to stabilize climate finance and to increase the proportion of COVID-19 recovery packages allocated to “green” initiatives that decrease carbon emissions.

Related SDGs

  • SDG 4. Quality Education
    • Target 4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development
  • SDG 13. Climate Action
    • Target 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
    • Target 13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning
  • SDG 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
    • Target 9.4: By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities
  • SDG 12. Responsible Consumption and Production
    • Target 12.C Rationalize inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption by removing market distortions, in accordance with national circumstances, including by restructuring taxation and phasing out those harmful subsidies, where they exist, to reflect their environmental impacts, taking fully into account the specific needs and conditions of developing countries and minimizing the possible adverse impacts on their development in a manner that protects the poor and the affected communities
Panelists

[Moderator]

  • Kim Sook, Chairman of the Strategic Planning and Coordination Committee, NCCA

[Panelists]

  • Patrick V. Verkooijen, CEO of Global Center on Adaptation
  • Soogil Young, Chairman of SDSN Korea
  • Bindu N. Lohani, Chairman of Board, Clean Air Asia, Philippines
  • Jean Asselborn, Minister of Foreign and European Affairs, Luxembourg

Special Roundtable on Inter-Korean Economic Cooperation

11:00 – 12:40, Grand Ballroom B, The Commons

1. Rationale

The motivation for this special roundtable session is to address the further expectations of the inter-Korean relations. Since the inter-Korean summit in April and the North Korea-U.S. summit in June 2018, the economic integration between North Korea and South Korea has been greatly emphasized. In particular, the inter-Korean economic cooperation has great potential to impact not only the East Asia region, but also adjacent countries and the global stage. This has transitioned to the importance and role of inter-Korean economic cooperation for sustainable peace and co-prosperity in the Korean Peninsula. In order to achieve the two goals, a greater understanding of South Korea’s economic cooperation with mid- to long-term development with North Korea is needed and the role of the Korean government and enterprises to contribute in the inter-Korean economic cooperation must be explored.

2. Key Message

Korea is the only divided country in the 21st century world. Since the Korean War Armistice, continuous efforts have been made towards promoting peace and a new security system in Korea. However, the future of the Korean Peninsula remains unanswered. Historically, the inter-Korean relations have been unpredictable as both countries encountered with multiple leadership changes, as well as challenges and prospects in the Peninsula. Economic integration between North Korea and South Korea has been one of the emerging strategies in the Korean Peninsula. The inter-Korean economic relations started to increase in 2005. Between 2004 and 2005, inter-Korean trade increased by more than 50% and exceeded USD 1 billion worth of profit. Various projects were operated such as the Kaesong Industrial Complex, and increased inter-Korea trade boosted the inter-Korean economic cooperation. Due to the abandonment of the Kaesong Industrial Complex in 2016, there has been slow progress within the inter-Korean economic cooperation. Currently, there is a dramatic shift with economic cooperation between the two Koreas. In fact, the inter-Korean economic cooperation projects have been considered as opportunities for new economic growth by governments. In 2018, South Korean President Moon Jae-in proposed to build a “single economic community through joint economic zones along the North-South border, a linked rail network, and other steps.” President Moon also stated the greater potential and opportunities of the inter-Korean economic cooperation with the future economic initiatives. This session will discuss the current initiatives and the future vision of the inter-Korean economic cooperation and its future role and direction in the framework of international development cooperation and sustainable development.

3. Objectives
  • Review the current status of Inter-Korean Economic Cooperation and share the future vision
  • Explore the role of the South Korean government and enterprise within the inter-Korean cooperation to strengthen the international economic cooperation
  • Discuss sustainable development in North Korea through the promotion of human resources and economic resources
  • Suggest the current as well as future role and direction of inter-Korean economic cooperation in the framework of international development cooperation and sustainable development
4. Moderator
  • MOON Chung-in | Emeritus Professor at Yonsei University
5. Panelists
  • LEE InYoung, Member of the Korean National Assembly, Chair of the Korean National Assembly's Special Committee on Inter-Korean Economic Cooperation
  • JI SangWuk, Member of the Korean National Assembly
  • KIM Joo Hyun, President of Financial News, Republic of Korea
  • KANG Sung Jin, Professor at Korean University
  • PARK Kyung-Ae, Professor at University of British Columbia

GEEF 2019 International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs I

Friday, February 15, 2019 at 13:00-14:30 – IBK Hall, The Commons, Yonsei University

CONCEPT NOTE

1. Rationale

The International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs aims to provide a platform for academic knowledge-sharing and discussion on research related to the SDGs. The SDGs as a whole are a new field of study, and thus all 17 goals require in-depth and evidence-based research. There is also a need for much academic exchange across different fields and countries to further enhance the individual efforts as well as overall pool of work.

The International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs has significance as the first session on paper presentations held at GEEF. Abstracts were gathered through a Call for Papers, with applicants from diverse backgrounds, including professional researchers, young scholars, and practitioners. The finalists were chosen through a blind review in order to select the most outstanding proposals with the most potential for exemplary accomplishment. It is hoped that these sessions will lead to both the advancement of the research on these topics and a clearer direction for their practical applications.

2. Abstracts

GCED inthe Era of the UN SDGs: Teach What and How inHigher Education?
Young-Gil Kim & Jeffrey Choi


Global Citizenship Education(GCED)as a priority global education agenda has been implemented since the launch of the UN Sustainable Development Goals(SDGs) in2015. While GCED itself is a target to achieve as the target 4.7 in the SDGs, it is also recognized as one of the most important cross-cutting issues and solutions in concerted efforts of achieving the UN SDGs by 2030.

With such importance of GCED in the era of the UN SDG sin mind, the UNESCO has identified the goals and core elements of GCED and developed different approaches and practices to deliver them. One of the main goals in GCED is to nurture the so-called responsible “global citizens,” who have a deep understanding on global issues and behavioral capacities to act collaboratively at both global and local levels for a more “just, peaceful, tolerant, inclusive, secure and sustainable world.” Values, attitudes, and non-cognitive skills are emphasized as core elements of GCED along with a conventional focus of learning on knowledges, cognitive skills, and behavioral capacities. These have been attempted in participatory and transformative pedagogical practices in various forms and platforms.

Problems of GCED in practices since 2015, however, are that less attentions and efforts have been made to GCED in higher education, which is expected to bring out larger social impacts and influences through educating young leaders of the societies. Likewise, there have been no concrete or structured GCED programs in higher education that cover both cognitive and non-cognitive elements of GCED with equal importance. Although a lifelong education perspective from childhood is crucial for GCED as the UNESCO emphasizes, delivering GCED in higher education should gain a renewed attention in a perspective of addressing and achieving the SDGs with a time sensitive manner under the timeline by 2030.

Amid the absence of a standardized GCED program for higher education, this paper suggests formulating a GCED program designed for students in higher education. It argues that the courses in a GCED program for higher education should be a case and evidence oriented learning with a mandatory practicum, which enable the students experience the power of engagement, interaction, participation, and partnership in deliberation of expected outcomes of GCED for the UN SDGs. Course designs for this is also explained in detail in the paper.


A Scoping Review for SDG 16 and SDGs’ socioeconomic targets: The Need of Nurturing A Responsive City for Sustainable Urban Communities in Asian Megacities
Meithya Rose Prasetya Puteri and Achmad Firas Khudi


Asia is the most populated continent in the world that are home for more than half of the world’s population. The huge urban population gaining benefit from the globalization of technology and finance affects the existence of Asian megacities. Complex urban issues persisting in Asian megacities force city governments to be more responsive. The city governments are expected to offer smart solutions to the complexities of societal problem yet implement basic services equally. Thus, the city governments have to transform itself into responsive city.

The responsive city as a term was introduced and popularized by Stephen Goldsmith, the former city manager of New York, the United States of America. The term emphasizes on how city governments can escalate their practices of smart city in a more responsive way through harnessing integrated data platform. In responsive city, the city governments not only have to fit the data platform into the current urban challenges but also foresee the unpredicted urban challenges. In view of this explanation, this paper will examine the applicability of the responsive city on sustainable urban communities in eight Asian megacities applying a scoping review. The Asian megacities include Tokyo, Japan; Shanghai, China; Jakarta, Indonesia; Delhi, India; Seoul, South Korea; Manila, Philippines; Dhaka, Bangladesh; Karachi, Pakistan.

The scoping review is a narrative integration of the relevant evidence that examines preliminary measurement of potential size and range of available research literature. It also aims to identify nature and extent of research evidence. In addition to the method, there are variables on sustainable communities and governance including civic engagement, urban transport, women and child protection, health policy, educational policy, security protection, and effective bureaucracy that will be scrutinized. Those variables are derived from social well-being aspect and paired with socioeconomic targets in SDG 3, 4, 5, 11, 16, and 17.

Our preliminary finding recommends that the abovementioned megacities have applied the responsive city ranging from minimum to medium level. The eight Asian megacities have also implemented the term of responsive city partially corresponding to the smart cities operated in theirs. Furthermore, this paper will suggest relevant policy recommendations drawing upon policy mapping from the scoping review. Keywords: responsive city, sustainable communities, megacity


Analysis of corporate climate disclosures in the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Greater Bay Area in the perspective of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures
Holly So


Climate change has proved itself an apparent and present danger to the physical world as well as to the corporate world. In the face of growing climate risks, institutional investors and corporations are increasingly aware of the associated impacts on their respective assets and businesses. This paper contributes to the discussion around enhancing climate disclosures in corporates in line with the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) published in June of 2017. It explores the status of current disclosure practice in the largest corporations by market cap in the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Greater Bay Area. The Greater Bay Area, as a key strategic initiative of China’s development blueprint, is positioned to enhance connectivity and leverage strengths between China’s southern cities in order to facilitate cooperation and integration towards regional economic development. For analyses, this paper selected 32 Chinese-listed corporates from the Hang Seng Stock Connect Big Bay Area Composite Index (HSBBAC) filtered according to TCFD-identified high climate risk sectors. Public disclosures, in the form of their latest Annual Reports and Sustainability Reports were examined against the 11 detailed recommendations that underpin TCFD’s four core elements of governance, strategy, risk management, and targets and metrics. This analysis sheds light on the disclosure gap between what corporations are reporting and what industry demands. Corporations publish climate disclosures in response to corporate responsibilities, industry trends, and regulatory compulsion whilst level of disclosure is often determined succeeding to global reporting initiatives and stock exchange guidelines. In turn, rationales shape professional awareness and corporate capacity in climate disclosure interdependent to level of green investment. Using the TCFD recommendations as an apt proxy for global investor demand and industry standards, this paper probes opportunities where the Greater Bay Area could be developed into a hub of financial capacity for climate disclosure to derive climate resilience and financial stability in support of the sustainable development of the Greater Bay Area.

3.Panel
  • Márcia Balisciano (Moderator) | Director of Corporate Responsibility, RELX
  • Jeffrey Choi | Professor, UN Academic Impact Korea
  • Achmad Firas Khudi | Field Officer of LOCALISE, UCLG ASPAC
  • Holly So | Postgraduate Student, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology

* The International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs is supported by Samsonite through the Samsonite Travel Grants awarded to presenters traveling from abroad.

GEEF 2019 Parallel Session on Peace and SDGs

Friday, February 15, 2019 at 13:00 – 14:30 – Kwak Joung-Hwan Challenge Hall, The Commons, Yonsei University

CONCEPT NOTE

1. Rationale

The existing rapid urbanization has caused various urban problems such as traffic congestion, energy shortage, and environmental degradation. On the other hand, urbanization has great opportunities to make significant progress in emerging countries such as China, India, Southeast Asian countries, the Middle East and Africa. The development of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is emerging as an alternative to the paradigm shift of existing urban planning, construction, and operations.

Future city, which is called Smart City, is a concept that is applied to a platform where advanced ICT technology is applied to cities, and many projects are being carried out in developed countries as well as developing countries. For example, new transport modes, such as autonomous vehicles and drones, has emerged as key solutions to solve urban traffic problems. The change of mobility is expected to transform the spatial structure of the city and create positive changes in the life styles of citizens. For instance, urban traffic system controlled by AI (Artificial Intelligence) can reduce traffic congestion by maximizing efficiency even using existing road network. Citizens can also participate directly in the decision making of urban planning. Although previous city plans have used various means to collect the citizens’ opinion such as public hearing, the outcomes are still not yet satisfactory. By utilizing the block chain technology, various devices can be implemented to directly ask the citizens’ needs and opinions, and reflect them in today’s urban policies.

The goal of smart city is to resolve the current urban problems, secure sustainability, and increase the quality of life to create a city where citizens are happy. New challenges always entail social and economic costs. The experiences of the successes and failures of developed countries provide good examples for cities that are newly building cities. Moreover, the field of smart city needs to gather the wisdom of global scholars with a new frontier that no one has ever seen. To do this, various universities around the world and Yeosijae will continue extensive cooperation to research future cities and build success stories. This session aims to be the starting point.

2.Key Messages

In this parallel session, four distinguished speakers, including Prof. Jung Hoon Lee, Prof. Michael D. Lepech, President Michael Zhang, and Dr. Lise Tjørring, will present their topics on future cities and smart cities considering sustainability and applicability.

In recent years, the Smart City or Smart City developments have been driven by two trends. The first is the rollout of ICBM+AI (e.g. IoT, Cloud Computing, Bigdata, Mobility and Artificial Intelligence etc.) services & infrastructures within cities; the second is the need to find environmentally sensitive forms of growth that utilize energy sparingly. This implicates that how next generation of smart city development will be with a dynamic process of fostering an open innovation platform in the age of 4th Industrial Revolution. Therefore, this session intends to develop a stage to discuss about various future city initiatives, approaches, ideas, and technologies that are not only scalable but also implementable throughout the world.

3. Objectives
  • To develop a consensus on needs of sustainability and smart city index.
  • To suggest ways to finance on infrastructures and services for future cities.
  • To discuss the goals of future cities and smart cities.
4. Panel
  • Yeon Ho Lee (Moderator) | Professor, Yonsei University
  • Jung Hoon Lee (Speaker) | Professor, Yonsei University
  • Michael D. Lepech (Speaker) | Professor, Standford University
  • Michael Wen Zhang (Speaker) | President, SenseTime
  • Lise Tjørring (Speaker) | Postdoc, Industrial PhD, University of Copenhagen
  • Bernard Debarbieux (Panelist) | Dean, Geneva School of Social Sciences
  • Chungha Cha (Panelist) | Representative, Re-Imaging Cities Foundation
BIOGRAPHY

1. Yeon Ho Lee (Moderator)

Dr. Yeon Ho Lee is a professor of Political Science in the Department of Political Science and International Studies, Director of Yonsei-EU Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, and Director of the Center for Canadian Studies (Institute of East and West Studies) at Yonsei University. He received his BA in Political Science at Yonsei University. He studied political science at the University of Cambridge, UK, with the support of the Chevening Scholarship, and obtained MPhil and PhD. Prior to joining Yonsei University, Dr. Lee had been an ESRC Fellow at the University of Warwick of the United Kingdom.

His research and teaching interests include international development cooperation and EU, development theories and the Korean political economy. He is the author of The State, Society and Big Business in South Korea, Routledge and Theories of Development, Yonsei University Press, and Unequal Development and Democracy in South Korea, Pakyongsa

2. Jung Hoon Lee (Speaker)

Dr. Jung Hoon Lee is currently the associate dean and professor of Technology & Innovation management at Yonsei University. He was also a visiting scholar with the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. Dr. Lee has been involved in R&D projects, sponsored by the South Korean government, including developing a national strategy and vision for Smart City, analyzing and designing Smart City services and implementation, and developing Performance Management Systems for Smart City operations. Currently, he serves the leading role of developing Smart City Index model as part of national Smart City R&D project (2018-2022) and as the chair of smart city committee for Seoul Metropolitan City.

Prof LEE also contributed several consulting and advisory roles to international organizations including CISCO, GSMA, SKT, KT, and LG CNS. Professor LEE received a B.Eng./MSc. from the University of Manchester and MSc from the London School of Economics and Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge.

3. Michael D. Lepech (Speaker)

Dr. Michael D. Lepech is the associate professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment of Stanford University.

Dr. Lepech’s research focuses on the integration of sustainability indicators in to engineering design, ranging from materials design, structural design, system design, to operations management. Furthermore, Dr. Lepech has been focusing on the design of sustainable high-performance, the impacts of sustainable materials on building and infrastructure design and operation, and the development of new life cycle assessment (LCA) applications for building, transportation, and water systems. Dr. Lepech obtained his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and completed MBA of Finance and Strategy at the University of Michigan.

4. Michael Wen Zhang (Speaker)

Mr. Michael Wen Zhang is the President of SenseTime, the world’s most valuable artificial intelligence (AI) unicorn that focuses on computer vision and deep learning. He has been responsible for the company’s operation, strategic development, mergers and acquisitions, government relations, and other commercial functions. Mr. Zhang was rewarded of the prestigious Shanghai Magnolia Award, is a licensed attorney in the state of New York, and a visiting professor at Donghua University and Shanghai Maritime University. He is the managing partner of Summit Capital Equity Investment Fund in Shanghai. Formerly, Mr. Zhang also worked at the United Nations and on Wall Street. He received his JD degree from Harvard Law School and an MBA from Columbia Business School.

5. Lise Tjørring (Speaker)

Dr. Lise Tjørring is a social anthropologist and postdoctoral researcher on the research project HumanImpact at the Department of Cross-Cultural and Regional studies, Faculty of Humanities, University of Copenhagen. She does various research on integrating social and cultural knowledge in private companies with a particular focus on companies working with sustainability and smart energy technology. She obtained Industrial Ph.D. in Food and Resource Economics at the University of Copenhagen.

6. Bernard Debarbieux (Panelist)

Dr. Bernard Debarbieux is the Dean of Geneva School of Social Sciences. He is a professor of political and cultural geography and urban and regional planning, and territorial planning. He works at the Department of Geography and the Institute of Environmental Sciences. Dr. Debarbieux’s research has a theoretical approach to territoriality, collective identities, and the social imaginary of space and an empirical analysis of the institutional practices of space. His research’s main fields of application are the European, North American, and North African mountains. He also specializes in the production of geographical knowledge and imagination planning, regional governance of the environment, public spaces, and political and collective territorialities.

7. Chungha Cha (Panelist)

Mr. Cha is co-founder and chair of Re-imaging cities foundation, which is a global network of experts in finance and sustainability brought together to develop successful business models around green buildings and smart cities. He received his MBA degree from Columbia Business School in 1985. His major is accounting, finance, and Real Estate. He received his B.S. degree in Economics from the Wharton School in 1979.

Mr. Cha has been in the finance industry for 20+ years and established Re-Imaging Cities Foundation under the Korea Green Building Council non-profit umbrella. He has been focused in the green building and smart cities space since 2007. Mr. Cha owns a majority interest in Susterra Partners, providing investment advisory services in the areas of energy efficiency, green buildings and clean energy.

GEEF 2019 PARALLEL SESSION ON QUALITY OF LIFE AND GOVERNANCE FOR FUTURE CITIES

PyeongChang Agenda for Peace (PCAP) 2030
Friday, February 15, 2019 at 13:00 – 14:30 – Global Lounge, The Commons, Yonsei University

CONCEPT NOTE

1. Rationale

The PyeongChang Agenda for Peace (PCAP) 2030 is the outcome document of the PyeongChang Global Peace Forum (PGPF) which is held on February 9 – 11, 2019 to commemorate the 1st anniversary of the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.

It is a joint initiative by the Gangwon Provincial Government, Municipality of PyeongChang, Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of Republic of Korea in partnership with the Korea International Broadcasting Foundation (Arirang TV), Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) and South Korean civil society organizations that are closely engaged in the process of peacebuilding and SDGs in Korea. The PGPF 2019 is also a main follow-up to the Hague Appeal for Peace (HAP) Conference in 1999, which was held on the 100th anniversary of the Hague Peace Conference in 1899. The HAP Conference adopted the Hague Agenda for Peace and Justice for the 21st Century which served as a common guide and reference document for global peace movement for the last two decades.

The PCAP 2030 is expected to be the updated and contextualized version of the Hague Agenda in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) whose target year is 2030. The PCAP is expected to be a linkage between peace and SDGs agenda as a tool to mainstream peace and disarmament agenda into the SDGs.The final version of the PCAP 2030 is expected to be adopted at the next PGPF in 2020 after a series of thematic and regional follow-up consultations after the PGPF 2019. The year 2020 is the 70th anniversary of the Korean (International) War that broke out on 25 June 1950 and ended on 27 July 1953 under the armistice agreement. In this way, PCAP 2030 is expected to bring synergetic cooperation between peace process and initiatives in the Korean peninsula and others in the world.

The idea of the PyeongChang Appeal for Peace (PAP) 2030 was conceived in February/March 2018 during the PyeongChang Olympics and Paralympics, which was a historical turning point from threats and confrontation to dialogues and cooperation for peacebuilding in the Korean peninsula. The PyeongChang peace sprit continued with a historical breakthrough when the heads of state from North Korea and the United States held a summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018. For the first time in 70 years after the Korean War, both countries set asides its hostile differences and agreed to cooperate for de-nuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and to establish new relations for peace.

The PGPF 2019 is expected to contribute towards this peacebuilding process and to sustain peace in the Korean Peninsula as means of public diplomacy initiated by local governments and civil society organizations. There is enthusiastic hope that the PyeongChang peace spirit will continue in the upcoming Olympics, particularly in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, the 2022 Beijing Olympics, and beyond.

2.Key Messages

There can be no sustainable development without peace, and
no peace without sustainable development.

(Preamble of UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, known as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), has posed both opportunities and challenges for people, civil society organizations, and government. A key to success is to develop comprehensive and practical agenda for action to link and integrate the peace and disarmament agenda into the SDGs, as emphasized by the UN Secretary General’s Agenda for Disarmament – Securing Our Common Future. PCAP 2030 will be a pathway to mainstream peace as well as human rights into the SDGs.

3. Objectives
  • Introduce and share the PyeongChang Agenda for Peace (PCAP) 2030 which is the outcome document of the PyeongChang Global Peace Forum (PGPF) held on February 9-11, 2019
  • Discuss ways about how to integrate peace and disarmament agenda into the SDGs, particularly SDG 16: Peace, justice and strong institutions
  • Discuss the relationship of the peace-building process in the Korean peninsula to the global and Asian peace process through public diplomacy on sport, peace and SDGs
4. Panel
  • Seonghoon Lee | Professor, Kyunghee University, Republic of Korea (Moderator)
  • Jinho Song | Vice-President of Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA), Republic of Korea
  • Daehoon Lee | Professor, SungKongHoe University
  • Ayoung Moon | Founder and Representative of PEACEMOMO
  • Goosoon Kwon | Dean, Faculty of Future Multidisciplinary Studies, Seoul Cyber University, Republic of Korea
BIOGRAPHY

1. Seonghoon (Anselmo) Lee

Dr. Seonghoon (Anselmo) Lee is currently the adjunct professor at Graduate School of Public Policy and Civic Engagement at Kyunghee University and Co-convener of the Steering Committee of the PyeongChang Global Peace Forum (PGPF) 2019.

He is also member of Policy Advisory Committee of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA), Human Rights Expert Committee of the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) and Policy Committee of the Korea NGO Council for Overseas Development Cooperation (KCOC).

Internationally, Dr. Lee was one of the founders of the Asia Democracy Network (ADN) and the Asia Development Alliance (ADA), a regional network of national CSO platforms on UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and now senior adviser to both. He also served as a member of International Board of CIVICUS from 2012 to 2016.

2. Jinho Song

Mr. Jinho Song is currently the Vice-President of the Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). He is the first Director with a civil society background in the history of KOICA. Mr. Song is also member of the Steering Committee of the PGPF 2019.

Prior to his service at KOICA, Mr. Song has been closely involved in civil societies for over 30 years. Previously, he was the Secretary General of YMCA Ulsan and Busan from 2014 to 2017 and Co-chair of the Global Call to Action against Poverty (GCAP) Korea from 2013 to 2015. Mr. Song also served in the NGO Council for Overseas Development Cooperation (KCOC).

3. Daehoon (Francis) Lee

Dr. Daehoon (Francis) Lee is currently a research professor of peace studies at SungKongHoe University in Seoul. He is currently the advisor and coordinator for PGPF 2019 and a Trainer and Programme Developer at PEACEMOMO, specializing in training teachers and trainers on critical and creative peace education that are based on new, learner-oriented pedagogical principles.

Dr. Lee is also the Founder and Chief Coordinator for PSPD (People’s Solidarity for Participatory Democracy), former Executive Director of ARENA (Asian Regional Exchange for New Alternatives, Asia-wide), and Director of the Center for Peace and Disarmament, Korea. He has coordinated CENA (Civil Society Education Network in Asia), a collaborating network of universities committed for peace, human rights, and democracy studies in Asia and served as a legal advisor to the Special Rapporteur of the UN Human Rights Sub-Commission in 2005.

4. Ayoung Moon

Ms. Ayoung Moon is the Founder and Representative of PEACEMOMO, a non-profit organization that focuses on linking peace activism to learning spaces. She is also currently a member of the Steering Committee of the PGPF 2019, a chair of a Subcommittee for Social Value Management of Korean Film Council, a chairperson of Seoul Youth Hub Steering Committee, and member of a Standing Committee of the National Unification Advisory Council.

Formerly, Ms. Moon was a member of a Preparatory Committee of Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education and a consultant of Asia-Pacific region consultation group of United Nations Asia-Pacific Region on Youth, Peace, and Security. She is also a Ph.D. candidate in Peace Education at University of Peace, Costa Rica.

5. Goosoon Kwon

Dr. Goosoon Kwon is currently Dean of the Faculty of Future Multidisciplinary Studies at Seoul Cyber University, where he has devoted to teach and research global issues, international development, and war and peace. He also serves as Chair of International Affairs Committee of the Korea Association of International Development and Cooperation and advisor of humanitarian affairs of KCOC.

Prior to joining the academia, Dr. Kwon had extensive field experiences in humanitarian assistance, post-conflict reconstruction and peacebuilding, and international development as a practitioner of the Red Cross and Red Crescent (RC/RC) movement, International non-government organization (INGO), and United Nations Peacekeeping (UN PKO) mission for the last 13 years.

GEEF 2019 International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs II

Friday, February 15, 2019 at 15:00-16:30 – IBK Hall, The Commons, Yonsei University

CONCEPT NOTE

1. Rationale

The International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs aims to provide a platform for academic knowledge-sharing and discussion on research related to the SDGs. The SDGs as a whole are a new field of study, and thus all 17 goals require in-depth and evidence-based research. There is also a need for much academic exchange across different fields and countries to further enhance the individual efforts as well as overall pool of work. The International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs has significance as the first session on paper presentations held at GEEF. Abstracts were gathered through a Call for Papers, with applicants from diverse backgrounds, including professional researchers, young scholars, and practitioners. The finalists were chosen through a blind review in order to select the most outstanding proposals with the most potential for exemplary accomplishment. It is hoped that these sessions will lead to both the advancement of the research on these topics and a clearer direction for their practical applications

2. Abstracts

Revitalizing Global Partnerships for Sustainable Development: A Focus on Korea’s Bilateral Knowledge Sharing Programs (KSP) from 2005-2018

Hye Yong Kim


When it comes to offering suggestions as to the policies, programs, and projects in development cooperation, it is essential to note the socioeconomic conditions of the partner countries. Moreover, it is important to utilize the comparative advantages of all partner countries to achieve synergy in development cooperation. The Republic of Korea has been ensuring these when the Ministry of Strategy and Finance, previously known as the Ministry of Finance and Economy, launched its Knowledge Sharing Program (KSP) in 2004 with the aims of sharing Korea’s experience and knowledge in industrialization, democratization, and development, and to assist partner countries in lessening the knowledge divide and to support their development efforts (KSP website, accessed October 14, 2018).

With the SDG #17 being “Revitalizing the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development,” knowledge-intensive development programs flow in various directions, whether that be North-South, South-South, or OECD DAC member country to partner country and more. While Korea aims to successfully implement its role as a responsible member of the international community and to contribute to the global development efforts, this paper aims to answer the question: to what extent has Korea’s bilateral KSP policy consultations contributed to SDG #17? This paper will study Korea’s bilateral consultations from December 2005 to July 2018 – a total of 235 policy consultations published on the KSP website – and observe how Korea contributes to SDG #17. Consequently, it aims to take the following steps to answer the research question: (1) identify the objectives and standards of offering KSP to a country and an industry, (2) observe the patterns and trends of KSP, and (3) conduct a feasibility study on the KSP offered to that country and industry and identify whether it has been utilized efficiently or will be utilized effectively. Finally, (4) the above steps together with the specific targets of SDG #17 will be compared and contrasted to evaluate whether Korea’s bilateral KSP policy consultations contribute to the goal.


An expert-based assessment of the potential for local people involvement in nature conservation in the Niassa National Reserve in Mozambique

Aires Afonso Mbanze, Natasha Ribeiro and José Lima Santo


Implementation of new conservation measures and adoption of external actions from elsewhere without consistent consultation and systematic assessment, evaluation and proposal steps, have resulted in multiple fails that have been replicated unnecessarily with wasted resources implications.

In this study, we propose and test a novel method to identify: (i) the role of all conservation-relevant actors, including local people, in major threats to conservation in a particular protected area, (ii) the underlying drivers for the involvement of local people in conservation-threatening practices and (iii) an appropriate policy-mix to address these drivers.

The method takes stoke of experts’ opinion who are aware of the situation in the protected area under study. This method is developed and tested in the context of the Niassa National Reserve (NNR), in Mozambique, a major protected area in Africa for the conservation of Miombo savannah woodlands and lions. Respondents’ answers were analysed through Principal Component (PC) and Cluster methods to group them according to opinions in relation to threats, current and new proposed compensation schemes that can be implemented to improve conservation in NNR. Relationships between the opinions of respondents and their socio-economic profile were also tested based on Fisher’s Exact and Post Hoc tests.

Results show high degree of consensus among respondents in relation to the current practices that represent the top threats to conservation in the reserve, including poaching, illegal mining and shifting cultivation. Lower degrees of consensus were found with regards to more moderate threats. Local people were held responsible for those activities they need to undertake to cope with their daily needs, most of them, except shifting cultivation, not being identified as top threats. On the other hand, outsiders carrying out illegal activities, such as poaching, were held responsible for practices representing the top threats to conservation, with local people acting as supporters of these outsiders’ activities.

New proposed in-kind incentives that help local people to adopt environmentally-friendly cultivation practices, such as provide them with alternative sources of animal protein and provide local young people study opportunities (scholarships) would greatly improve the conservation status of biodiversity currently under threat and would also raise the awareness of local people. Responsibilities of actors in relation to the activities that threat conservation, were well distinguished with cluster analysis, which can be used to tackle each responsible with different policy measures.

Sustainable Finance Implementation in Emerging Markets: developments and challenges in Indonesia

Taridi Kasbi Ridho


Purpose –The paper intends to describe the developments and challenges of implementing the sustainable finance practices in an emerging country as part of important role played by finance sector companies in the achievement of sustainable development goals (SDGs). Many believed that sustainable finance practice that considered multi aspect of economic, social, and environmental risk and return would deliver more benefits to wider stakeholders than traditional finance that emphasis only on financial risk and return. The implementation of sustainable finance would enable finance companies to maximize their role as a catalysator for creation of environmentally friendly investment and fair economical social system to achieve sustainable development goals (SDGs) more effectively. In addition, the companies would also gain several additional benefits of stronger company’s resilience, green financial product and services domination, access to cheaper from global green financial market, better company reputation, as well as cost reduction through efficiency in many areas. Indonesian Financial Service Authority (FSA) had launched a Roadmap for Sustainable Finance 2014-2019, then followed by the issuance of Indonesian FSA regulation in 2017 on Sustainable Finance Implementation for Finance Service Institutions, Issuer, and Listed Companies with the objective to increase sustainable finance supply and increase risk management and disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach – This research will observe finance companies which were included in the 200 top listed companies in Indonesia, measured by their revenues, for the three consecutive years of 2014, 2015, and 2016. Secondary data will be gathered from 2014, 2015, and 2016 company’s annual report, company’s CSR/sustainability report, and on-line CSR information on company’s web site. Measurement of sustainable finance implementation of each company is conducted by employing content analysis of those reports using SDG Compass which links the SDGs with GRI (Global Reporting Initiative). Descriptive analysis will be employed to understand the sustainable finance implementation across different companies. Deeper explanation will also be provided by conducting qualitative analysis to several Indonesian banks that had implemented FSA regulation on sustainable finance in the recent years.

Research limitations– As this research will be focus on Indonesian listed finance companies, more research is needed to include companies that have participated in sustainable finance implementation but have not listed in the Indonesian stock exchange.

Originality/value – Current research on sustainable finance in emerging economies in general and specially in Indonesia is still limited. This paper will enrich the understanding of sustainable finance implementation by private sector in developing countries especially in Indonesia context.

3.Panel
  • Taedong Lee (Moderator) | Professor, Yonsei University
  • Hye Yong Kim | Postgraduate Student, Seoul National University
  • Aires Afonso Mbanze | Research Assistant, Lúrio University
  • Taridi Kasbi Ridho | Senior Lecturer, State Islamic University (UIN) Jakarta

* The International Young Scholars' Perspectives: Spotlight on National Initiatives for the SDGs is supported by Samsonite through the Samsonite Travel Grants awarded to presenters traveling from abroad.